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Sunday, August 15, 2004

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» Asia by Blog from Simon World
Asia is an interesting place... Hong Kong, Taiwan and China Tom follows-up on the fate of Chinese dissident law professor Yuan Hongbing. He also has a further follow-up on Li Dan, a well-known Chinese AIDS activist, and reports on Roger Moore's visit t... [Read More]

» Asia by Blog from Simon World
Asia is an interesting place... Hong Kong, Taiwan and China Tom follows-up on the fate of Chinese dissident law professor Yuan Hongbing. He also has a further follow-up on Li Dan, a well-known Chinese AIDS activist, and reports on Roger Moore's visit t... [Read More]

» Asia by Blog - Month in review from Simon World
Thank you to everyone for the good wishes. Everyone is doing well. Now to keep you going...as part of the Winds of Change team I provide a monthly briefing on Asian goings-on, particularly China and SE Asia. I thought this would give me a good opportun... [Read More]

» Simon's E. Asia Overview: Aug 25/04 from Winds of Change.NET
It's time to have a look at East Asia and what's been making the news in Asian blogs over the past month. We cover China (in depth), as well as Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore et. al). [Read More]

Comments

hanin

Of course it is difficult to take in the fact that Korea's liberation from Japan came by the great aid of nations other than Korea. It is a sort of fact that any nation will have a difficult time processing as they attempt to give due reflection to their past generations. But Yangban no nation's history is perfect. Although we all try to emphasize our own autonomous selves or nationhood, the little details of history always give solemn pause to the actual difficulties. But let's not forget the "soo manmyung" who died actually fighting for independence prior to 1945; should I mention 3.1? I find your "emphasis min" somewhat insulting; but from your past postings, I want to judge that it was otherwise.

zecks

Hanin--why is the "emphasis mine" part insulting? Yangban is just remarking on how Korean affairs were affected by "a meeting halfway across the world." Does it bother you because it reminds you how America saved your ancestors (the first time around)? Maybe you should keep it in mind as China prepares to devour your country.

lirelou

Pity that the Cairo Declaration did not state that Korea would become "sovereign". Perhaps there would be less emotion attached to the word. My view may be simplistic, but it would appear that while outside powers can make an international state sovereign, only its own citizens can truly make it "free". So let's all raise a glass to those Korean patriots who fought and died to make that happen. Much like the Americans at Yorktown, whose victory was guaranteed by ... the French. Ah well, dispute though we might, at least the readers of this column don't have an "815th Mechanized Corps" to commemorate "liberation" by a Korean Peoples' Army that didn't even exist yet. 22.7 million Koreans are remembering this victory as the work of kim il-sung.

The Yangban

lirelou,
True about the French (and the Dutch and Spanish). Their help cut several years off of the war.

hanin,
There is certainly no shame in being liberated by great powers. The fact is that Japan was a major power that consider Korea to be a vital part of its empire. Without WW2, Korea might be looking like Tibet.

When Korea eventually is unified, I expect that 'Unification Day' may Replace Liberation Day on the Korean calendar and March First would be the sole Independence holiday. After all, we Americans don't celebrate September 3 (the date the Treaty of Paris was signed).

non korean

I don\\\'t think Korea will stop celebrating Aug 15th. 99% of Koreans seem to think Japan magically disapeared from Korea or were driven out somehow by the Koreans. Very few know that they owe their independence to the US and the allies. Ignorance is bliss. You might be right but distortion of history has worked very well for Korea.

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